Microsoft Development News –Visual Studio 2015 RC and VS Code multiplatform

Today @Build conference is announced the release of Visual Studio 2015 RC. This version includes many new features and updates, such as tools for Universal Windows app development, cross-platform mobile development for iOS, Android, and Windows, including Xamarin, Apache Cordova, and Unity, portable C++ libraries, native activity C++ templates for Android, and more.

And now, you can watch our great Build 2015 session recordings as they become available, or catch-up on your favorite features with 40+ of our brand new short Connect(“on-demand”); feature videos.

To install the most recent version of Visual Studio 2015, use the following link.

Download: Visual Studio 2015 RC

To learn more about the most recent version of TFS, see the Team Foundation Server RC release notes.

Windows Holgografic is another Announcement regarding the vision of HoloLense and integration with all from IOC to Home Media .

imageb50_holo

Important: Most applications you build with Visual Studio 2015 RC are considered “go-live” and can be redistributed and used in production settings as outlined in the license agreement. However, those that are built for Windows 10 cannot be distributed or uploaded to the Windows Store. Instead, you will have to rebuild applications built for Windows 10 by using the final version of Visual Studio 2015 before submitting to the Windows Store. Also, please note that ASP.NET 5 is still in preview and is not recommended for production use at this time. You are free to use ASP.NET 4.6 in production.

Last November, Microsoft said that it would bring some of the core features of its .NET platform — which has traditionally been Windows-only — to Linux and Mac. Today, at its Build developer conference, the company announced its first full preview of the .NET Core runtime for Linux and Mac OS X.

In addition, Microsoft is making the release candidate of the full .NET framework for Windows available to developers today.

The highlight here, though, is obviously the release of .NET Core for platforms other than Windows. As Microsoft VP of its developer division S. “Soma” Somasegar told me earlier this week, the company now aims to meet developers where they are — instead of necessarily making them use Windows — and .NET Core is clearly part of this move.

Microsoft says it is taking .NET cross-platform in order to build and leverage a bigger ecosystem for it. As the company also noted shortly after the original announcement, it decided that, to take .NET cross-platform, it had to do so as an open source project. To shepherd it going forward, Microsoft also launched the .NET Foundation last year.

While it’s still somewhat of a shock for some to see Microsoft active in the open-source world, it’s worth remembering that that the company has made quite a few contributions to open source projects lately.

Even before the .NET framework announcement, the company had already open-sourced theRoslyn .NET Compiler platform. Earlier this year, Microsoft shuttered its MS OpenTechsubsidiary, which was mostly responsible for its open source projects, in order to bring these projects into the overall Microsoft fold.

Entity Framework 6 is Feature Complete including async , RTM later this year

I try to put together some information’s related to the release of RC for EF6.

 

What  is New in EF6

This is the complete list of new features in EF6.

Tooling

Our focus with the tooling has been on adding EF6 support and enabling us to easily ship out-of-band between releases of Visual Studio.

The tooling itself does not include any new features, but most of the new runtime features can be used with models created in the EF Designer.

Runtime

The following features work for models created with Code First or the EF Designer:

  • Async Query and Save adds support for the task-based asynchronous patterns that were introduced in .NET 4.5. We’ve created a walkthrough and a feature specification for this feature.
  • Connection Resiliency enables automatic recovery from transient connection failures. The feature specificationshows how to enable this feature and how to create your own retry policies.
  • Code-Based Configuration gives you the option of performing configuration – that was traditionally performed in a config file – in code. We’ve created an overview with some examples and a feature specification.
  • Dependency Resolution introduces support for the Service Locator pattern and we’ve factored out some pieces of functionality that can be replaced with custom implementations. We’ve created a feature specification and a list of services that can be injected.
  • Interception/SQL logging provides low-level building blocks for interception of EF operations with simple SQL logging built on top. We’ve created a feature specification for this feature and Arthur Vickers has created a multi-part blog series covering this feature.
  • Testability improvements make it easier to create test doubles for DbContext and DbSet. We’ve created walkthroughs showing how to take advantage of these changes using a mocking framework or writing your own test doubles.
  • Enums, Spatial and Better Performance on .NET 4.0 – By moving the core components that used to be in the .NET Framework into the EF NuGet package we are now able to offer enum support, spatial data types and the performance improvements from EF5 on .NET 4.0.
  • DbContext can now be created with a DbConnection that is already opened which enables scenarios where it would be helpful if the connection could be open when creating the context (such as sharing a connection between components where you can not guarantee the state of the connection).
  • Default transaction isolation level is changed to READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT for databases created using Code First, potentially allowing for more scalability and fewer deadlocks.
  • DbContext.Database.UseTransaction and DbContext.Database.BeginTransaction are new APIs that enable scenarios where you need to manage your own transactions.
  • Improved performance of Enumerable.Contains in LINQ queries.
  • Significantly improved warm up time (view generation) – especially for large models – as the result of a contributions from AlirezaHaghshenas and VSavenkov
  • Pluggable Pluralization & Singularization Service was contributed by UnaiZorrilla.
  • Improved Transaction Support updates the Entity Framework to provide support for a transaction external to the framework as well as improved ways of creating a transaction within the Framework. See this feature specificationfor details.
  • Entity and complex types can now be nested inside classes.
  • Custom implementations of Equals or GetHashCode on entity classes are now supported. See the feature specification for more details.
  • DbSet.AddRange/RemoveRange were contributed by UnaiZorrilla and provides an optimized way to add or remove multiple entities from a set.
  • DbChangeTracker.HasChanges was contributed by UnaiZorrilla and provides an easy and efficient way to see if there are any pending changes to be saved to the database.
  • SqlCeFunctions was contributed by ErikEJ and provides a SQL Compact equivalent to the SqlFunctions.
  • Interception/SQL logging provides low-level building blocks for interception of EF operations with simple SQL logging built on top. We’ve created a feature specification for this feature and Arthur Vickers has created a multi-part blog series covering this feature.
  • Testability improvements make it easier to create test doubles for DbContext and DbSet. We’ve created walkthroughs showing how to take advantage of these changes using a mocking framework or writing your own test doubles.
  • Extensive API changes as a result of polishing the design and implementation of new features. In particular, there have been significant changes in Custom Code First Conventions and Code-Based Configuration. We’ve updated the feature specs and walkthroughs to reflect these changes.
  • EF Designer now supports EF6 in projects targeting .NET Framework 4. This limitation from EF6 Beta 1 has now been removed.

The following features apply to Code First only:

  • Custom Code First Conventions allow write your own conventions to help avoid repetitive configuration. We provide a simple API for lightweight conventions as well as some more complex building blocks to allow you to author more complicated conventions. We’ve created a walkthough and a feature specification for this feature.
  • Code First Mapping to Insert/Update/Delete Stored Procedures is now supported. We’ve created a feature specification for this feature.
  • Idempotent migrations scripts allow you to generate a SQL script that can upgrade a database at any version up to the latest version. The generated script includes logic to check the __MigrationsHistory table and only apply changes that haven’t been previously applied. Use the following command to generate an idempotent script.
    Update-Database -Script -SourceMigration $InitialDatabase
  • Configurable Migrations History Table allows you to customize the definition of the migrations history table. This is particularly useful for database providers that require the appropriate data types etc. to be specified for the Migrations History table to work correctly. We’ve created a feature specification for this feature.
  • Multiple Contexts per Database removes the previous limitation of one Code First model per database when using Migrations or when Code First automatically created the database for you. We’ve created a feature specification for this feature.
  • DbModelBuilder.HasDefaultSchema is a new Code First API that allows the default database schema for a Code First model to be configured in one place. Previously the Code First default schema was hard-coded to “dbo” and the only way to configure the schema to which a table belonged was via the ToTable API.
  • DbModelBuilder.Configurations.AddFromAssembly method  was contributed by UnaiZorrilla. If you are using configuration classes with the Code First Fluent API, this method allows you to easily add all configuration classes defined in an assembly. 
  • Custom Migrations Operations were enabled by a contribution from iceclow and this blog post provides an example of using this new feature.