Overview Microsoft Technical Summit 2016 and .Net Developer Conference

I recently held a talk for http://www.dotnet-developer-conference.de/ About  – Microservices and Scalable Backends  with Azure Service Fabric, and also a Transition path from a legacy application to scalable application.

Slides: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Akicn3-kM3q2hcpDxdbumEC7gd9usw

Regarding Microsoft’s Technical Summit(); is an event mainly for developers, providing announcements round to Microsoft’s developer Stack.

Again, a sensation to the topic Microsoft and Linux: Microsoft joins the Linux Foundation and is a Board Member there in the future! At the same time, Google is member of the .NET Foundation!

Microsoft has unveiled a Visual Studio for Mac OS X. The new IDE is however no porting existing Visual Studio, which runs only on Windows, but only an extended version of the product beginning 2016 in relation to the acquisition by Xamarin with purchased Xamarin Studio, which in turn is based on the free Mono develop. The new IDE supports the first step in the Microsoft strategy “mobile first, cloud first” only the development by Xamarin apps for iOS and Android, as well as Web applications and REST based Web services with .NET core. The programming languages can choose the developer between c# and f #.

Visual Studio “15” is now called Visual Studio 2017 and is now available as a release candidate.

Visual Studio 2017 and Visual Studio for Mac now offer a graphical view of the preview for Xamarin forms. So far, developers could write XAML tags in the editor and only saw the result at run time. Graphic design by mouse, the developers of WindowsPresentation Foundation (WPF), Silverlight or Windows universal apps are used, is still not possible on a Xamarin Forms interface.

.NET core, ASP.NET core and entity framework core version 1.1 released.

ASP.NET 1.1 core should be 15 percent faster and equips numerous functions (URL rewriting, response caching, HTTP compression, new process host listener, use of view components per day helper, new locations for sensitive data) after.

In entity framework core 1.1, Microsoft provides some programming functions from the predecessor entity framework 6.1 again at the disposal, which were missing in entity framework core 1.0. This searches for objects in the cache with find(), explicitly load of related objects with load() method, renewed preloaded objects with reload()loading as well as the simple query of object content, old and new, with GetDatabaseValues() and GetModifiedProperties(). Also the mapping to simple fields instead ofproperties and the recovery of lost database connections (connection resiliency) to the Microsoft SQL Server or SQL azure is possible again. The ability to map objects to the memory-optimized tables from Microsoft SQL Server 2016 is brand new. In addition, the makers have simplified the API with the standard functions can be replaced by entity framework core by their own implementations.

.NET 1.1 core Linux Mint 18, 42.1, OpenSUSE come with macOS 10.12 and WindowsServer 2016 as operating systems added. Samsung delivers core for Tizen also .NET.A further step in the direction of cross-platform compatibility of Microsoft products.NET represents core for the Tizen operating system, the Samsung, since June 2016Member has developed the .NET Foundation, together with relevant Visual Studio Tools.

The Team Foundation Server “15” 2017 receives the version number like Visual Studio. He had previously reached the stage release candidate 2 is now available as RTM version available

The new Visual Studio Mobile Center is a cloud application, the hosted on Github source code for IOS and Android apps automatically translated at each commit, testson real hardware and distributed successfully tested app packets to beta testers. Also, a usage analysis and run-time failure is possible. The supported programming languages are swift, objective-C, Java and c# (Xamarin). Support for Cordova and Windows universal apps is planned.

SQL Server for Linux: In March, Microsoft announced to provide the SQL Server in the future also for Linux. There is now a preview version of the database server for RedHat Enterprise Linux, Ubuntu Linux, macOS and Windows, as well as docking available. A version for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server is to follow soon. The latest release is called SQL Server Community Technology Preview vNext and represents an evolutionof SQL Server 2016, with new features in addition to the platform independence were shown in the keynote, nor previously listed on the website.

For the SQL Server 2016, a Service Pack 1 available now, that contains significant improvements in the licensing model in addition to bug fixes.

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Best Feature of TFS 2015 Update 1

Shortly before Christmas 2015 was the TFS 2015 Update 1 released, within this release are some new features that bring more productivity to Team Development and DevOps.

Here are some of my favorites :

TFVC and Git in the same Team Project

Lots of my customers have TFVC (centralized version control) in TFS. When Git support came out, the only option they had if they wanted to switch to Git was to create a new “Git-based” Team Project and port source code over. Then they got into a horrible situation where work items were all in the TFVC Team Project, and the source code was in the new Git Team Project.

Now, you can simply add a new Git repo to an existing TFVC Team Project! Navigate to the Code hub in Web Access, click the repository drop-down (in the top left of the Code pane) and select “New Repository”:

image

Enter the name of your repo and click Create. You’ll see the new “Empty Git page” (with a handy “Clone in Visual Studio” button):

imageThe Repository drop-down now shows multiple repos, each with their corresponding TFVC or Git icon:

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You can also add TFVC to a Git Team Project! This makes sense if you want to source control large assets. That way you can have your code in Git, and then source control your assets in TFVC, all in the same team project.

If you’re looking for alternatives to supporting large files in Git, then you’ll be pleased to note that VSO supports Git-LFS. Unfortunately, it’s not in this CTP – though it is planned for the Update 1 Release. As a matter of interest, the real issue is the NTLM authentication support for Git-LFS – the product team are going to submit a PR to the GitHub Git-LFS repo so that it should be supported by around the time Update 1 releases.

Query and Notifications on Kanban Column

Customizing Kanban columns is great – no messing in the XML WITD files – just open the settings, map the Kanban column to the work item states, and you’re good to go. But what if you want to query on Kanban column – or get a notification if a work item moves to a particular column? Until now, you couldn’t.

If you open a work item query editor, you’ll see three additional fields that you can query on:

  • Board Column – which column the board is in. Bear in mind that the same work item could be in different columns for different teams.
  • Board Column Done – corresponding to the “Doing/Done” split
  • Board Lane – the swimlane that the work item is in

image Not only can you query on these columns, but you can also add alerts using these fields. That way you could, for example, create an alert for “Stories moved to Done in the Testing column in the Expedite Lane”.

Pull Requests in Team Explorer

You’ll need Visual Studio 2015 Update 1 for this to work. Once you have Update 1, you’ll be able to see and create Pull Requests in the Team Explorer Pull Requests tile. You can also filter PRs and select between Active, Completed and Abandoned PRs. There are PRs you’ve created as well as PRs assigned to you or your team. Clicking a PR opens it up in Web Access:

 

  Team Board Enhancements

There’s a lot to discuss under this heading. If you’re using the Kanban boards, you’ll want to upgrade just for these enhancements.

Team Board Settings Dialog

The Board Settings Dialog has been revamped. Now you can customize the cards, columns, CFD and team settings from a single place – not a single “admin” page in sight! Just click the gear icon on the top right of a Backlog board, and the Settings dialog appears:

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Field Settings

TFS 2015 RTM introduced field customization, so not much has changed here. There’s an additional setting that allows you to show/hide empty fields – if you’ve got a lot of cards, hiding empty fields makes the cards smaller where possible, allowing more cards on the board than before.

Customisable Styles

You can now set conditional styling on the cards. For example, I’ve added some style rules that color my cards red (redder and reddest) depending on the risk:

image You can drag/drop the rules (they fire in order) and of course you can rules for multiple fields and conditions. You can change the card color and/or the title color (and font style) if the condition matches. Here’s my board after setting the styles:

image
Tag Coloring

You can now colorize your tags. You can see the iPhone and WindowsPhone tags colored in the board above because of these settings:

image
Team Board Settings

Under board settings, you’ll be able to customize the Columns (and their state mappings, Doing/Done split, and Definition of Done. Again you’ll see a drag/drop theme allowing you to re-order columns.

image

The same applies to the swimlanes configuration.

As a bonus, you can rename a Kanban column directly on the board by clicking the hearer:

image

Charts and General

Under “Charts” and “General” you’ll be able to configure the CFD chart as well as the Backlogs (opt in/out of backlogs), Working Days and how your bugs appear (Backlogs or Task boards or neither). These settings used to be scattered around the UI, so it’s great to have a single place to set all of these options.

Tasks as Checklists

If you use Tasks as checklists, then this is a great new feature. Each Story (or Requirement or PBI, depending on your template) card now shows how may child Tasks it has. Clicking on the indicator opens up the checklist view:

image

You can drag/drop to reorder, check to mark complete and add new items.

Task Board Enhancements

The Task board also gets some love – conditional styling (just like the Kanban cards) as well as the ability to add a Task to a Story inline.

More Activities Per Team Member

You can now set multiple activities per team member. I’ve always thought that this feature has been pretty limited without this ability:

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Now you have a real reason to use the Activity field on the Task! The Task burn down now also shows actual capacity in addition to the ideal trend:

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As a bonus, you can now also add new Team members directly from the Capacity page – without having to open up the Team administration page.

Team Dashboards

The “old” Home page (or Team Landing page) let you have a spot to pin charts or queries or build tiles. However, you couldn’t really customize how widgets were positioned, and if you had a lot of favorites, the page got a little cluttered. Enter Dashboards. You can now create a number of Dashboards and customize exactly which widgets appear (and where). Here I’m creating a new “Bugs” dashboard that will only show Bug data. Once you’ve created the Dashboard, just click the big green “+” icon on the lower right to add widgets:

image

Once you’ve added a couple of widgets, you can drag/drop them around to customize where they appear. Some widgets require configuration – like this “Query Tile” widget, where I am selecting which query to show as well as title and background color:

imageHere I’m customizing the Query widget:

image

You can see how the widgets actually preview the changes as you set them.

To add charts to a Dashboard, you need to go to the Work|Queries pane, then select the chart and add it to the Dashboard from the fly-out menu:

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Similarly, to add a Build widget to the Dashboard you need to navigate to builds and add it to the Dashboard of your choice from the list of Builds on the left.

Now I have a really cool looking Bugs Dashboard!

image

Test Result Retention Policies

There is a tool for cleaning up test results (the Test Attachment cleaner in the TFS Power Tools) – but most users only use this when space starts running low. Now you can set retention policies that allow TFS to clean up old run, results and attachments automatically. Open up the administration page and navigate to the Test tab:

image

Team Queries: Project-Scoping Work Item Types and States

If you have multiple Team Projects, and at least one of them uses a different template, then you’ll know that it can be a real pain when querying, since you get all the work item types and all the states – even if you don’t need them. For example, I’ve got a Scrum project and an Agile project. In RTM, when I created a query in the Agile project, the Work Item types drop-down lists Product Backlog items too (even though they’ll never be in my Agile Team Project). Now, by default, only Work Item Type (and States) that appear in your Team Project show in the drop-down lists. If you want to see other work item types, then you’re doing a “cross-Project” query and there’s an option to turn that on (“Query across projects”) to the top-right of the query editor:

image

Policies for Work Item Branch

Now, in addition to Build and Code Review policies for Pull Requests in Git branch policies, you can also require that the commits are linked to work items:

imageYou can also just link the PR to a work item to fulfill the policy.

Labeling and Client-site workspace mapping in Builds

The build agent gets an update, and there are some refreshed Tasks (including SonarQube begin and end tasks). More importantly, you can now label your sources on (all or just successful) builds:

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Also, if you’re building from a TFVC repo, you can now customize the workspace mapping:

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And Stay tuned, because will come some other features in Update 2 that are in VSO now like :

 

Build widgets in the catalog

As Karen wrote about in the dashboards futures blog, one area we’re focusing on is improving the discoverability and ease in bringing different charts to your dashboard. With this update, you’ll see a new option to add a build history chart from the dashboard catalog, and you’ll be able to configure the build definition displayed directly from the dashboard.

Adding a build history chart from the dashboard catalog

Markdown widget with file from repository

The first version of the markdown widget allowed custom markdown stored inside the widget. You can now choose to display any markdown file in your existing repository.

Selecting a markdown file for display in the widget

Or add the file to any dashboard in your team project directly from the Code Explorer.

Displaying a markdown file in a dashboard

Check out all the January features in detail for Visual Studio Team Services:

https://www.visualstudio.com/news/2016-jan-25-vso

TFS 2015 Update 1 RC is Here

In The new Release cadence have Microsoft Developer Division the VS2015 update 1 CTP & TFS 2015 update 1 RC released . – download if you like –  http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=49192

Backlog looks Fancy and have more features that can be used on Planning meetings

Working with tasks directly on the Kanban board

Some of the my favorites that where in VSO for a while now are :

  • Version control: use Git and Team Foundation Version Control in the same project, history and getting started improvements on the web portal, social #ID in pull requests, commit details summary is easier to read, and an improved experience for cloning Git repositories.
  • Backlogs: multi-select on all backlogs, drag any item to an iteration from anywhere, Add panel on the iteration backlog, line on the burndown indicates actual capacity, configure settings directly, add/remove users in the sprint plan, and multiple activities per team member in planning capacity for a sprint.
  • Kanban boards: query on columns, card coloring, tag coloring, inline renaming of columns and swimlanes, reorder cards when changing columns, configure settings directly, and hide empty fields on cards.
  • Work items and tasks: tasks as checklist, link to branches and pull requests in work items, task board card coloring, and limit values shown for Work Item type in queries.
  • Build: improved access control for resources, improved source control integration, usability fixes in Build Explorer, and parity with XAML builds for label sources and client-side workspace mappings.
  • Testing: export test outcome for manual tests and test result retention policy improvements.
  • Dashboards: 100% customizable with new widgets and multiple dashboards.
  • SonarQube: works for Java programs built with a Maven task, SonarQube Analysis build tasks work with on-premises and hosted agents.

Sonarqube build tasks

 

you can read more about here- https://www.visualstudio.com/news/tfs2015-update1-vs

Silverlight 6 – NO Go from Microsoft Team

For few months has the Microsoft team the answer to  Visual Studio User Voice case .

Shortly described :

While Microsoft continues to support Silverlight, and remains committed to doing so into 2021, there will be no new development work except security fixes and high-priority reliability fixes.

Silverlight out-of-browser apps will work in Windows 10. Silverlight controls and apps will continue to work in Internet Explorer until October 12, 2021, on down-level browsers and on the desktop.

Our support lifecycle policy for Silverlight remains unchanged:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search/default.aspx?alpha=Silverlight&Filter=FilterNO

As was stated in this blog post, the need for browser extensions including ActiveX controls and Browser Hosted Objects has been significantly reduced by the advances of HTML5-era capabilities which also produce interoperable code across browsers. On the web, plugin-based architectures, such as Silverlight, are moving towards modern open standards, such as HTML5, CSS and JavaScript which are supported on a wide variety of browsers and platforms.

For future development, we recommend modernizing Silverlight applications to HTML5 solutions which provide broader reach across platforms and browsers. In addition to the solutions listed in the blog post above, there is a free .NET Technology Guide eBook to help with migration planning located at:http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/6/E/16E9FC39-0D61-4DB8-AADE-9F6950B8BF49/Microsoft_Press_eBook_NET_Technology_Guide_for_Business_Applications.pdf

Microsoft Development News –Visual Studio 2015 RC and VS Code multiplatform

Today @Build conference is announced the release of Visual Studio 2015 RC. This version includes many new features and updates, such as tools for Universal Windows app development, cross-platform mobile development for iOS, Android, and Windows, including Xamarin, Apache Cordova, and Unity, portable C++ libraries, native activity C++ templates for Android, and more.

And now, you can watch our great Build 2015 session recordings as they become available, or catch-up on your favorite features with 40+ of our brand new short Connect(“on-demand”); feature videos.

To install the most recent version of Visual Studio 2015, use the following link.

Download: Visual Studio 2015 RC

To learn more about the most recent version of TFS, see the Team Foundation Server RC release notes.

Windows Holgografic is another Announcement regarding the vision of HoloLense and integration with all from IOC to Home Media .

imageb50_holo

Important: Most applications you build with Visual Studio 2015 RC are considered “go-live” and can be redistributed and used in production settings as outlined in the license agreement. However, those that are built for Windows 10 cannot be distributed or uploaded to the Windows Store. Instead, you will have to rebuild applications built for Windows 10 by using the final version of Visual Studio 2015 before submitting to the Windows Store. Also, please note that ASP.NET 5 is still in preview and is not recommended for production use at this time. You are free to use ASP.NET 4.6 in production.

Last November, Microsoft said that it would bring some of the core features of its .NET platform — which has traditionally been Windows-only — to Linux and Mac. Today, at its Build developer conference, the company announced its first full preview of the .NET Core runtime for Linux and Mac OS X.

In addition, Microsoft is making the release candidate of the full .NET framework for Windows available to developers today.

The highlight here, though, is obviously the release of .NET Core for platforms other than Windows. As Microsoft VP of its developer division S. “Soma” Somasegar told me earlier this week, the company now aims to meet developers where they are — instead of necessarily making them use Windows — and .NET Core is clearly part of this move.

Microsoft says it is taking .NET cross-platform in order to build and leverage a bigger ecosystem for it. As the company also noted shortly after the original announcement, it decided that, to take .NET cross-platform, it had to do so as an open source project. To shepherd it going forward, Microsoft also launched the .NET Foundation last year.

While it’s still somewhat of a shock for some to see Microsoft active in the open-source world, it’s worth remembering that that the company has made quite a few contributions to open source projects lately.

Even before the .NET framework announcement, the company had already open-sourced theRoslyn .NET Compiler platform. Earlier this year, Microsoft shuttered its MS OpenTechsubsidiary, which was mostly responsible for its open source projects, in order to bring these projects into the overall Microsoft fold.

Release Management and DevOps with TFS 2013 and future – FAQ

The Subject of Operations (DevOps) it is meanwhile an Hot aspect in the ALM of any application from the point of view of Delivery, Quality, Costs and Reliability. That is the first part of an series regarding this topic.

I will use  a dummy MVC Web Application that’s basically the Visual Studio 2013 template plus a small modification to the web.config so that we can demo the workflow but The same Flow can be , sure with depending complexity with any kind of Application (Native, Multiplatform, Managed or hybrid combinations).

The example I have is to show a message on the home page from a setting in the web.config. This setting then varies based on the environment (dev, prod, etc) the application is running on, and this will be the variable that will be changed by web.config transformations and Release Manager.

Although I’m using an AppSettings key, you can use it for other settings and connection strings as well. The same rules apply.

I made the following modifications:

Index.cshtml

HomeController.cs

Web.config

The application should show  the msg from the web.config settings as per below (running from Visual Studio);

Setting up web.config transforms

I’ll not go into too much detail on how to setup web.config transforms and what the transformation syntax is for them, as they’ve been very well explained on MSDN.

The strategy that I used here was to structure my transformations so that:

  1. The original web.config file has the settings needed for the developer to run in debug mode in Visual Studio
  2. I added a new configuration (Release) that will have the proper web.config transformations to put tokens in the key/values that I need to be changed later by Release Management:

The same transformed config using Release configuration will be used by Release Management (RM) to deploy to all the environments in the release path.RM will then substitute the “__EnvLabel__” token with the appropriate value for each target deployment environment.

TFS Build

You can use any template for the build, including the RM template to trigger a release directly from the build.

The trick here is to force the web config transformation to happen during build, so you end up with a web.config that has the tokens RM is expecting. By default, web config transformations only happen during deployment.

In order for you to add this behaviour, you can add the following arguments to MSBuild:

/p:UseWPP_CopyWebApplication=true /p:PipelineDependsOnBuild=false

Also, make sure that you’re building the correct configuration that has the transforms to add the token (in our example is Any CPU and Release):

Once the build finishes, the output should look like this (noticed the web.config transformed to include the token):

Release Path setup

Now, we have to take that config and replace the tokens with the proper values according to the target environment. In this example, I’m going to use an Agent-based setup. I’ll update this later to also include an Agent-less deployment using PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC).

First we configure Release Manager Server, Release Management Client and a deployment agent on the target server. You can find more detailed information on setting up those parts here: Install Release Management Server and Client, Install Deployment Agents..

I used the same target server to simulate both DEV and PROD IIS environments, by using two different ports:

Then I configured a server in RM to point to that box:

Next I configured the two environments, DEV and PROD:

Next step is to configure a release path where we have a DEV -> PROD deployment flow:

The setup above is, of course, overly simplistic for demo purposes. What you should have in mind is that you can configure who can approve (individuals or groups), who can validate and whether those steps are automated or not. In my example, I don’t need approvals for DEV, but need one for PROD. When the deployment workflow is initiated, DEV will be deployed automatically while PROD will wait for an approval before proceeding.

Next step is to configure the components to be deployed, in this case our web application:

I chose to use the “builds with application” option, since I’m going to use the build definition that will be defined in the release path.

Next, I’ll setup the deployment tool. In my case, XCopy, but you can use MS Deploy or other tool as appropriate:

The secret of the web.config token replacement happens here on the Configuration Variables. We specify that the replacement happens “Before Installation”, so that the config file is updated before being copied to the target server. We also specify the wildcard to tell RM what files we want RM to look for tokens: in this case *.config.

Next we define the release template. In this example:

  • You can see the DEV -> PROD workflow
  • Servers in the deployment (I only have one in this example, but you might have multiple most likely)
  • Components: the application being deployed (you might have to manually add it by right-clicking Components
  • I included optional steps to backup current site, and to rollback in case deployment fails (more of a best practice, but they’re not necessary)

Notice that the “EnvLabel” token we specified before gets a value here, depending on the environment, along with the other variables like target and backup folders:

Deploying

Let’s get some action going!

We initiate the release manually, choosing the template we configured previously, PROD as the last stage and selecting the last build as the one to deploy:

After a while we should see the following results:

Notice that the deployment to DEV was completed, but deployment to PROD is waiting for approval.

DEV has been successfully deployed:

While PROD has not yet:

The reason is that we’re waiting for approval. Let’s go ahead and open the approval window using the RM web client:

Clicking on the “Approve” for the selected release, we get the following dialog:

If we want to approve, but delay the deployment for later (off-hours deployment), we can click on the “Deferred Deployment” and select a day/time for when the deployment will execute:

After approval is given, the workflow resumes and finishes deploying to PROD:

There you have it!

How to Use TFS with Scaled Agile Framework

Using Team Foundation Server , Visual Studio,  to increase productivity and transparency into your application as well as increase the rate at which you can ship high quality software throughout the application lifecycle.

In the Following whitepaper is described How-TO: Using TFS to support epics, release trains, and multiple backlogs.

The Scaled Agile Framework, or SAFe, is  popular among organizations looking to scale Agile practices to the enterprise level. SAFe is a comprehensive framework, covering practices from portfolio level planning to release planning to coding practices.

While TFS does not provide full support for all SAFe practices, TFS can be used to implement many of the planning practices. This whitepaper also provides practical guidance on how to implement SAFe practices using TFS. It covers the following topics:

ALM_SAF_Overview1-4_Opt

The first two sections are conceptual and provide a quick overview of how TFS supports SAFe.The last two sections are guidance and provide detailed steps for the TFS Administrator to configure and customize TFS to support SAFe.

Mapping SAFe concepts to TFS concepts

  SAFe supports a portfolio view of multiple agile teams. SAFe illustrates how a portfolio vision is met by a hierarchy of teams, all of whom have their own specific objectives. This framework breaks down Epics into Features and Stories, which teams work on in Sprints and deliver through Program Increments (PIs) and Release Trains. Also, the portfolio backlog can track how deliverables map to Strategic Themes and associated budgets.

SAFe architectural overview © D. Leffing..

Image courtesy of Leffingwell, LLC.

The examples in this paper illustrate how to add the Epic WIT and backlog, configure a three-level team hierarchy, and map teams to their respective area and iteration paths. The examples build from the TFS Agile process template. However, the changes can be applied to any TFS process template.

TFS structure to support SAFe

SAFe Portfolios, Programs, and Teams map to TFS team projects and teams

Because TFS supports a hierarchical team structure, each team has its own view of their work which rolls up to the next level within the team hierarchy.

SAFe roles to TFS teams

image

In the section, “Customize TFS process to support SAFe”, details the changes to our Scrum, Agile, and CMMI process templates which enable SAFe support. The goal is not to create a SAFe Process Template, but modify existing process templates to enable SAFe practices. This changes are minimal and don’t encumber teams who choose not to use SAFe.

Now, you have the following options to update the templates to include these changes :

  1. You can download the standard Scrum, Agile, CMMI process templates with changes for SAFe here.
  2. If you have customized process templates, you can follow the instructions in the guidance. Additionally, in this blog post shows how to automate the process with PowerShell.

This whitepaper assumes a familiarity with the Scaled Agile Framework. If you’re familiar with Scrum but not familiar with SAFe, Inbar Oren has published these great videos which explain the basic SAFe concepts quickly.

Have fun with the process!

How To Use TFS 2013 with SharePoint 2013 Sp1 and Sql 2012 sp1 on Windows 2012 R2

In new deployment scenarios you will need the TFS 2013 or 2012 on an windows 2012 R2 server, that will never support SharePoint 2010, so we need an SharePoint 2013 SP1, that support windows 2012 R2 for now.

Before Run all Windows Updates before installing SharePoint 2013, and get the CU updates of Sql2012 sp1 and SharePoint 2013 Sp1 .

If That box already has TFS 2013 on an windows 2012 R2 server . by Installing updates are the key steps that will prevent tantrums from SharePoint . Always, install of the required updates and ideally the optional ones also.

installation of SharePoint 2013 with Sp1

SharePoint Team They have really slicked up the installation process for SharePoint,

Instead use the auto-run that comes from running the DVD directly, or you can just run the “prerequisiteinstaller” from the root first.

image

When the prerequisites are complete you can start the installation proper and enter your key . If you get this wrong you will be next completing an uninstall to pick the right option. You can Avoid express at all costs and in this case we already have Team Foundation Server 2013 Sp1 installed and already have SQL Server 2012 sp2 installed.

Using configuration wizard will lead you through the custom config but if  you are running on a local computer with no domain, like me, then you will have to run a command line to generate the database before you proceed.

Well, do not dispair because PowerShell –as always –  is your friend. So just start the SharePoint 2013 management PowerShell console and use the cmdlet :

New-SPConfigurationDatabase

image

image

We have now a farm we can complete the configuration. Just work though the wizard as , although you are on your own if you select kerberos for single sign-on.

SharePoint 2013 SP1 will then run though its configuration steps and give you a functional, but empty SharePoint environment. At the end you get a simple Finish button and some instructions that you need to follow for getting your site to render in a browser.

Info: SharePoint 2013 works now in Chrome and other non Microsoft browsers…

Now you get almost 25 services that you can chose to install or not. If you leave them all ticked then you will get about 10-12 new databases in SQL, Its too hard to figure out what the dependencies are and what you need .

If the verification of the SharePoint configuration passes then configuration should work

Configuring processes and extending can be long and will add solution into SharePoint. Will be a site template added but as it will likely look the nice new SharePoint 2013 Sp1 interface we will need to create the site manually.

Configuration completed successfully

Now that the SharePoint bits have been setup we will have a default link setup between SharePoint and Team Foundation Server. Although if we had a separate Team Foundation Server instance we would need to tell it where the TFS server is.

Info: You have to install the Extensions for SharePoint Products on every front end server for your SharePoint farm.

SharePoint 2013 Web Applications Configuration in Team Foundation Server 2013

Now we have installed and configured the bits for SharePoint as well as telling it where the TFS server is we now need to tell TFS where to go.

There is no account listed as an administrator! I am using the Builtin\Administrator user as both the TFS Service Account and the SharePoint Farm Admin you don’t need one.

Site Configuration Collections

In order to have different sites for different collection and enable the ability to have the same Team Project name in multiple collection then you need to create a root collection site under the main site. Some folks like to create this at the ^/sites/[collection] level, but I always create the collection site as a sub site of the root. This have the benefit of creating automatic navigation between the sites…

This final test as when you click OK the Admin Console will go off and try to hook into, or create a site for us. if you do want to have a greater degree of separation between the sites and have them in different collections you can indeed do that as well. You may want to do that if you are planning to separate collection to multiple environments, but I can think of very few reasons that you would want to do that.

Using the new Team Project Site

If we create a new team project the template from the Process Template that you selected will be used to create the new site. These templates are designed to work in any version of SharePoint but they may look cool.

This team project was created before there was ever a SharePoint server so it has no portal. Lets go ahead and create one manually.

They have moved things around a little in SharePoint and we now create new sub sites from the “View Content” menu.

This, while much more hidden is really not something you do every day. You are much more likely to be adding apps to an existing site so having this more clicks away is not a big deal.

When we care the new site we have two options. We can create it using the provided “Team Foundation Project Portal” bit it results in a slightly ugly site, or you can use the default “Team Site” template to get a more native 2013 feel.

This is due to the features not yet being enables… so head on over to “cog | Site Settings | Site Actions | Manage site features” to enable them.

You can enable one of:

  • Agile Dashboards with Excel Reporting – for the MSF for Agile Software Development 6.x Process Template
  • CMMI Dashboards with Excel Reports – for the MSF for CMMI Software Development 6.x Process Template
  • Scrum Dashboards with Reporting – for the Visual Studio Scrum 2. Recommended Process Template

The one you pick depends on the Process Template that you used to create the Team Project. I will activate the Scrum one as I used the Visual Studio Scrum 2.0 Recommended Process Template which I heartily recommend. You will have noticed that here are 2 or 3 for each of the “Agile | SMMI | Scrum” monikers and this is due to the different capabilities that you might have. For example:

  • Agile Dashboards – I have TFS with no Reporting Services or Analysis Services
  • Agile Dashboards with Basic Reporting – I have Reporting Services and Analysis Services but not SharePoint Enterprise
  • Agile Dashboards with Excel Reporting – I have Everything! Reporting Services, Analysis Services and SharePoint Enterprise

If you enable the highest level of the one you want it will figure out the one that you can run  and in this case I can do “Scrum Dashboards with Reporting”.

sharepoint_scrum_boards

sharepoint_agile_boards_reporting
Scrum template does not have any built in Excel Reports, but it does have Reporting Services reports. Now when I return to the homepage I get the same/similar portal you would have seen in old versions of SharePoint 2010.

Conclusion

Team Foundation Server 2013 & 2012 works with SharePoint 2013 Sp1 on Windows server 2012 R2 and we have manually created our Team Project Portal site.

TFS in Cloud

Hosting of ALM in the cloud as software as a service is gradually becoming more and more popular.  The vision, of course, is ALM as a seamless service – making it really easy to get started, easy to scale, easy to operate, easy to access, …  You’ve seen from time to time about TFS team work with 3rd party hosting and consulting companies offering TFS services.  Was a lot of work in TFS 2010 on both the technical and licensing front to enable a new generation of cloud based TFS services.

Several months ago, Brian Harry wrote a post about our initial investigation into porting TFS to the Windows Azure platform.  Since then, MS continued to pursue it and  at this year’s PDC, was a demo of Team Foundation Server running on the Windows Azure platform.  MS announced that will deliver a CTP (basically an early preview) next year, but aren’t, by any means, done with the technical work, but, for now,  it’s a great case study to see what is involved in porting a large scale multi-tier enterprise application to Azure.

The demo represents an important step forward in getting TFS running on the Azure cloud platform.  The demo included not only that but also the remaining components of TFS running in the cloud – the ASP.NET application tier (running as a Web Role), the TFS Job Service (formerly a Windows service for periodic background tasks, now running as a worker role) and the TFS Build controller/agent (running in an Azure VM role).  The demo include also connecting from a web browser, Visual Studio and from Microsoft Test Manager.

One of the cool things is that, for the end user, TFS in the cloud looks pretty much like TFS on-premises.  Other than the fact that you can log in with an internet identity rather than a windows identity, you’ll find that the Visual Studio experience, for example, looks pretty much identical to a local TFS scenario.